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can your pussy do the dog




About the weekend:  It was utterly blissful.  Truly.  And we have had our fair share of celebratory snafus including one "romantic" Valentine's Day dinner that will be immortalized by a horribly epic and traumatic fight over expensive steak au poivre and probably too many dirty martinis. The weather turned out to be beautiful, our room at the inn was upgraded to a fancy suite with a cozy fireplace, we ate the most incredible food, we wandered unabashedly drunk on joy and love from one hour to the next and kissed in the streets like newlyweds.

We started off the weekend by getting our tattoos and the experience was like being dropped into a Kevin Smith movie complete with wacky living caricatures (the artists and the clientele), an entertaining backdrop of pithy dialogue and foul language, and all the bright and cool artwork on the studio walls topped off by Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World playing on the flatscreen.  I'd like to say it was all romantic and sweetly meaningful, but really it was just so vividly memorable, funny, and real.  It was the perfect way to begin our celebration.

The rest of our time was spent simply being present to pleasure in the moment... eating tiramisu in our pajamas on the couch, laughing until we were crying watching the irreverent ridiculousness of This is the End, looking at great art and cool shops in Provincetown, marveling at the odd wonders of the sex toy museum (we should all be grateful for modern technology, ahem), eating espresso ice cream in the sunshine under a sign that read "love & happiness", Tea Dancing where there was no tea but plenty of moving and grooving, hearing unexpected music in unexpected places (which pleased Alex to no end) like this one heard while eating the best duck confit and charcuterie plate, ever, hence the post title that simply tells the tale of over the top pleasure.  There was synchronicity and decadence around every corner, and we reveled in each new moment while also recalling so many little forgotten memories shaken loose by the ease of time and our togetherness.

About the anniversary:  Our relationship has changed and grown so much over time yet the love is still very much the same - deeply passionate, silly, quirky and even a little nerdy, wildly adventurous, honest, hopeful, and inspired by one other even in the smallest of ways.  Over twenty years of life together has confronted us with things we couldn't have ever imagined when we said "I do" fifteen years ago, challenges that could have been marriage enders (year 3 and year 13 were big ones), and huge revelations that have created a solid certainty that this really is a forever kind of thing.  Our marriage and love can not only survive but it has learned to thrive in both the most dire of circumstances and fallow seasons, as well as the through all the many mundane and extraordinary moments.

We have come to terms with "marriage" by our own making, an unconventional definition for sure.  Our life always seems to fill the space just outside the lines, and that's simply who we are.  There is no secret formula, just deeply brave honesty and communication that mostly begins with knowing ourselves, then each other.  What I've learned is that from this place of truth anything is possible, happiness is ultimately unavoidable, and Love ripens and grows in ways never expected.  And the process is unending.

"...to the depth and breadth and height my soul can reach..."

How Do I Love Thee ~ e. b. browning

Words read aloud on October 11, 1998 at our wedding in front of 126 witnesses.  Yes.  Who knew that this the sentiment would resonate so deeply, 15 years later.  

This, to me, is what a real fairytale is:  no happily-ever-after, but beautiful, passionate, even ridiculous new beginnings together, again and again and again... 







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